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Russian Nobel Prize-winning journalist sells a prize medal for $103.5 million in support of Ukraine.

 

Russian Nobel Prize-winning journalist sells a prize medal for $103.5 million in support of Ukraine.
Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov

.At an auction held on Monday in New York, Russian journalist Dmitry Muratov, editor-in-chief of the independent investigative newspaper "Novaya Gazeta", sold the Nobel Peace Prize he won last year for 103.5 million.


The auction house "Heritage Action," which organized the auction, announced that the medal was bought over the phone by an unnamed bidder, noting that the proceeds from the auction will go to the UNICEF humanitarian response mission for Ukrainian children displaced by the war.


Muratov received the prize in 2021 jointly with Filipino journalist Maria Resa, and the Nobel Committee honored them on that day for their "efforts in protecting freedom of expression."


Muratov's newspaper was suspended in March after Russia passed legislation imposing heavy prison sentences on anyone who criticizes the Kremlin's military operation in Ukraine.


Muratov was among a group of journalists who founded "Novaya Gazeta" in 1993 after the fall of the Soviet Union. This year, it became the only newspaper in Russia to criticize Russian President Vladimir Putin and his domestic and foreign policies.  The announcement of the suspension of the newspaper's work in Russia came more than a month after Moscow invaded Ukraine.


In April, Muratov was attacked on a train when someone threw paint mixed with acetone at him, causing burns to his eyes.


Since 2000, six journalists and people who worked with the newspaper "Novaya Gazeta" have been killed because of their jobs. One of them was Anna Politkovskaya, an investigative journalist, to whom Muratov gave the Nobel Prize when he won it.


Last year, Muratov told AFP that "this newspaper puts people's lives at risk," echoing "we will not leave anywhere". The prominent Russian journalist said in a video published by Heritage Action that winning the Nobel Prize "gives you a chance to have your voice heard".


"The most important message today is for people to understand that there is a war going on now and we have to help the people who are suffering the most," he said, referring in particular to children in refugee families.

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