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Putin warns of hitting ‘new targets’ if Kyiv gets new missiles

 

Putin warns of hitting ‘new targets’ if Kyiv gets new missiles

The Russia president issues a new warning to the West against providing Ukraine with long-range missiles as it attacks Kyiv.


 Russian President Vladimir Putin has said that the US missiles sent to Ukrainian troops won't make much of a difference on the ground in the conflict between Russia and Ukraine.

In live words aired on Russia 1, he said that the Russian Air Force "breaks them like walnuts" in the battle in Russia and Ukraine, stressing that it had destroyed dozens of them so far.

Meanwhile, the West threatened that if the US continued to back Ukraine, his nation would hit additional targets, and the US started arming Kyiv with longer-range missiles. "If such missiles are provided," he said, "we will bomb sites that we have not even started to hit."


He emphasised that supplying additional Western weaponry to the Ukrainian military would simply prolong the struggle and war between Russia and Ukraine.

He also said that all the Ukrainian drones that have been flying since the beginning of the Russian operation are "foreign manufactured."

It is worth noting that US President Joe Biden earlier declared his commitment to provide Ukraine with powerful and precise missile systems capable of striking Russian long-range targets with pinpoint accuracy as part of a $700 million armaments package as part of US backing for Ukraine.

Jonathan Viner, the White House's Deputy National Security Adviser, said that his government had requested the Ukrainians for assurances that they would not use these weapons to attack targets within Russian territory.

Ukraine has sought long-range equipment from its allies, particularly the Multiple Unleash Rocket System (MLRS), which can launch a salvo of missiles hundreds of kilometres away, with the goal of altering the trajectory of the continuing conflict with Russia.

Current and former energy officials told CNN that Russia's invasion of Ukraine, coupled with years of underinvestment in the energy industry, has plunged the globe into a crisis that rivals, if not exceeds, the oil crises of the 1970s and early 1980s.
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